Volcanogenic Massive Sulfide Focused Mapping Initiative, Slave Craton, Northwest Territories

Presenter:

 

Bernadette Knox – bernadette_knox@gov.nt.ca

 
 

Authors:

 
B. Knox – Northwest Territories Geological Survey, Yellowknife, NT, Canada
S.D. Stone – University of Saskatchewan, Saskatoon, SK, Canada
S.B. Austin-Fafard – University of Saskatchewan, Saskatoon, SK, Canada
Y.M. DeWolfe – Mount Royal University, Calgary, AB; University of Saskatchewan, Saskatoon, SK, Canada
V.T.H. Alain – University of Saskatchewan, SK, Canada
C.A. Partin – University of Saskatchewan, SK, Canada
B. Fisher – Northwest Territories Geological Survey, Yellowknife, NT, Canada
 

Summary:

 

The Northwest Territories Geological Survey (NTGS) volcanogenic massive sulfide initiative continues to map greenstone belts of the Slave craton in areas of elevated resource potential. The objective is to improve the knowledge of ore-forming processes and to better understand controls on base metal and precious metal endowment through increased understanding of the early Slave craton evolution, particularly the tectonic setting of the emplacement of volcanic rocks and related sedimentary rocks and relationship(s) to basement granitoids. 

Ongoing work has taken a multi-faceted approach to enhance the knowledge of the litho- and chemo-stratigraphy, setting and characteristics of volcanogenic massive sulfide bedrock geochemical anomalies of the Beaulieu River, Winter Lake, and Point Lake greenstone belts that are 110 km east-northeast, 250 km northeast, and 330 km northeast of Yellowknife respectively. Bedrock mapping (from 2016 to 2020) at 1:20 000, 1:5000 and 1:2000 scale has provided the details of the complex stratigraphy and geochemical signatures required for stratigraphic correlations within these volcanic belts. 

In 2020 bedrock mapping continued within the Point Lake greenstone belt in the “Arrowhead” outlier and the surrounding granitoid basement complex. This mapping occurred within the 65 000 line-km high-resolution magnetic survey flown by the NTGS in 2019. 

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